Talking about Race

Here are some resources to help us all learn more about race and how to be anti-racist.  We will continue to add to this list as information is available.  Community perspectives are invited as we learn together.  Email miparentedge@gmail.com to share resources you have found helpful.

Note:  The titles below provide links to external sources.  Some websites or publications may require a paid subscription to access the article.


RESOURCES

White Privilege and Racism – The Responsible Consumer

When are kids old enough to talk about racism? – Greater Good Science Center

Resources for talking about Race, Racism, and Racialized Violence with Kids – Center for Racial Justice in Education

Teaching about Race, Racism and Police Violence – Teaching Tolerance

Talking to children after racial incidents – University of Pennsylvania Graduate School of Education

How white parents can talk to their kids about race – NPR

How to talk to your kids about white privilege – Red Tricycle

How Adults Communicate Bias to Children – Greater Good Science Center
A new study suggests preschoolers can “catch” prejudice from grown-ups through nonverbal behavior—and it hints at solutions.

Five Ways to Reduce Racial Bias in Your Children – Greater Good Science Center
How do we combat racial prejudice? New research reveals how parents influence the formation of bias in children.

Rubbing Off – Greater Good Science Center Allison Briscoe-Smith explains how kids learn about race—and how their parents can help them make sense of difference.

How Adults Can Support the Mental Health of Black Children – Psychologist Riana Elyse Anderson explains how families can communicate about race and cope with racial stress and trauma.

How to Raise Kids Who Are More Tolerant Than You – Greater Good Science Center How can we avoid feeding hate and distrust in our children?

Anti-Racism Resources – Challenge Success

Racism and Violence: How to help kids handle the news – Child Mind Institute (Facebook Live event)

Racism and Violence:  How to help Kids Handle the News – Child Mind Institue

Dear white people, please read ‘White Fragility’ – Washington Post

Resources on Anti-Racism – Parent Map

Daily Actions – Seattle Indivisible
View daily actions you can take to enact change in our city and state.  – includes phone scripts for calling your representatives, links and more

Doing the work: Mercer Island Anti-Racism Resources & Support – provided by MyMercerIsland.com

Anti-Racist Resources – Greater Good Science Center


WATCH & LISTEN


What Does Being An Ally Look Like? – Cultures of Dignity, Shanterra McBride and Rosalind Wiseman

What Does Being an Ally Look Like? Part 2 – Cultures of Dignity, Shanterra McBride and Rosalind Wiseman

How to talk to Kids about Race and Racism – Virtual Town Hall presented by Seattle Girls’ School featuring Rosetta Lee

How to Confront your Implicit Bias – Katie Couric interviews Dr. Jennifer L Eberhardt, author of the book “Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice that Shapes What We See, Think, and Do”

White Fragility – Discussion with Dr, Robin DiAngelo, author of “White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism” Presented by Seattle Channel Live.

Uncomfortable Conversations with a Black Man – A conversation with Emmanuel Acho about race that many white people have never been able to have.

Racism and Violence: How to help kids handle the news – Child Mind Institute (Facebook Live event)

Helping Kids Process Violence, Trauma, and Race in a World of Nonstop News – Common Sense Media

Talking to Kids about Racism – Dr. Kira Banks


BOOKS

Children’s Books for learning about Race/Racism – KCLS

Children’s Book – Not My Idea: A Book about Whiteness – Anastasia Higginbotham

So You Want to Talk about Race Ijeoma Oluo

How to be an Anti-Racist – Ibram X Kendi

White Fragility: Why It’s So Hard for White People to Talk about Racism –  Dr. Robin DiAngelo  *View video ofDr. DiAngelo’s presentation on White Fragility in Seattle.

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice that Shapes What We See, Think, and Do – Jennifer L. Eberhardt PhD